Candelarva
Candelarva
Cosmonaut 2
Cosmonaut 2
Cosmic Spores
Cosmic Spores
Wormhole
Wormhole
Protostar
Protostar
Bifröst
Bifröst
Astral Pearls
Astral Pearls
Micronova
Micronova
Galactic Burrow
Galactic Burrow
Biopleiades
Biopleiades
Cosmonaut 1
Cosmonaut 1
Ophiuchus Minor
Ophiuchus Minor
Nebulous Arch
Nebulous Arch
Globular Cluster
Globular Cluster
Meteor Grotto
Meteor Grotto
Pupa Australis
Pupa Australis
Candelarva
CandelarvaCradled in a cave of ferns and moss, a delicate chandelier of light is lit by a patient glowworm, in Melba Gully, Great Otway National Park, Australia. This series was taken at Melba Gully (a rainforest walk in the Great Otway National Park) and at the Glowworm Tunnel (an abandoned train tunnel in the Wollemi National Park, near the Blue Mountains). The glowworms are fly larvae from a fungus gnat from the Keroplatidae family. This species is tiny, the worm about 1 cm, the gooey web cave they build around 3 cm wide or so. The larvae build a structure composed of a horizontal mucous tube suspended by a network of threads attached to rocks, bark or soil. They can turn around in the tube and move back and forth. They build snares, much like spiderwebs, decorated by sticky droplets that glow in the blue light emitted by their tails, attracting small insects. The species pictured in this series is Arachnocampa richardsae.
Cosmonaut 2
Cosmonaut 2Photographer Joaquin Baldwin gazes upon a constellation of glowworms near the moonlit entrance of the Glowworm Cave, Wollemi National Park, Australia. This series was taken at Melba Gully (a rainforest walk in the Great Otway National Park) and at the Glowworm Tunnel (an abandoned train tunnel in the Wollemi National Park, near the Blue Mountains). The glowworms are fly larvae from a fungus gnat from the Keroplatidae family. This species is tiny, the worm about 1 cm, the gooey web cave they build around 3 cm wide or so. The larvae build a structure composed of a horizontal mucous tube suspended by a network of threads attached to rocks, bark or soil. They can turn around in the tube and move back and forth. They build snares, much like spiderwebs, decorated by sticky droplets that glow in the blue light emitted by their tails, attracting small insects. The species pictured in this series is Arachnocampa richardsae.
Cosmic Spores
Cosmic SporesGlowworms decorate a vibrant wall of moss, ferns and roots, in Melba Gully, Great Otway National Park, Australia. This series was taken at Melba Gully (a rainforest walk in the Great Otway National Park) and at the Glowworm Tunnel (an abandoned train tunnel in the Wollemi National Park, near the Blue Mountains). The glowworms are fly larvae from a fungus gnat from the Keroplatidae family. This species is tiny, the worm about 1 cm, the gooey web cave they build around 3 cm wide or so. The larvae build a structure composed of a horizontal mucous tube suspended by a network of threads attached to rocks, bark or soil. They can turn around in the tube and move back and forth. They build snares, much like spiderwebs, decorated by sticky droplets that glow in the blue light emitted by their tails, attracting small insects. The species pictured in this series is Arachnocampa richardsae.
Wormhole
WormholeGlowworms illuminate one side of the Glowworm Cave, while the other is lit by a flashlight, at Wollemi National Park, Australia. This series was taken at Melba Gully (a rainforest walk in the Great Otway National Park) and at the Glowworm Tunnel (an abandoned train tunnel in the Wollemi National Park, near the Blue Mountains). The glowworms are fly larvae from a fungus gnat from the Keroplatidae family. This species is tiny, the worm about 1 cm, the gooey web cave they build around 3 cm wide or so. The larvae build a structure composed of a horizontal mucous tube suspended by a network of threads attached to rocks, bark or soil. They can turn around in the tube and move back and forth. They build snares, much like spiderwebs, decorated by sticky droplets that glow in the blue light emitted by their tails, attracting small insects. The species pictured in this series is Arachnocampa richardsae.
Protostar
ProtostarLuring prey with its inviting blue light, a glowworm creates a perfect trap underneath a mossy cavity, in Melba Gully, Great Otway National Park, Australia. This series was taken at Melba Gully (a rainforest walk in the Great Otway National Park) and at the Glowworm Tunnel (an abandoned train tunnel in the Wollemi National Park, near the Blue Mountains). The glowworms are fly larvae from a fungus gnat from the Keroplatidae family. This species is tiny, the worm about 1 cm, the gooey web cave they build around 3 cm wide or so. The larvae build a structure composed of a horizontal mucous tube suspended by a network of threads attached to rocks, bark or soil. They can turn around in the tube and move back and forth. They build snares, much like spiderwebs, decorated by sticky droplets that glow in the blue light emitted by their tails, attracting small insects. The species pictured in this series is Arachnocampa richardsae.
Bifröst
BifröstA glowworm makes a lovely bridge of light inside a mossy nook, under the exposed roots of a tree in Melba Gully, Great Otway National Park, Australia. This series was taken at Melba Gully (a rainforest walk in the Great Otway National Park) and at the Glowworm Tunnel (an abandoned train tunnel in the Wollemi National Park, near the Blue Mountains). The glowworms are fly larvae from a fungus gnat from the Keroplatidae family. This species is tiny, the worm about 1 cm, the gooey web cave they build around 3 cm wide or so. The larvae build a structure composed of a horizontal mucous tube suspended by a network of threads attached to rocks, bark or soil. They can turn around in the tube and move back and forth. They build snares, much like spiderwebs, decorated by sticky droplets that glow in the blue light emitted by their tails, attracting small insects. The species pictured in this series is Arachnocampa richardsae.
Astral Pearls
Astral PearlsSoil and moss surround the luminous trap of light placed by a glowworm in a miniature alcove, in Melba Gully, Great Otway National Park, Australia. This series was taken at Melba Gully (a rainforest walk in the Great Otway National Park) and at the Glowworm Tunnel (an abandoned train tunnel in the Wollemi National Park, near the Blue Mountains). The glowworms are fly larvae from a fungus gnat from the Keroplatidae family. This species is tiny, the worm about 1 cm, the gooey web cave they build around 3 cm wide or so. The larvae build a structure composed of a horizontal mucous tube suspended by a network of threads attached to rocks, bark or soil. They can turn around in the tube and move back and forth. They build snares, much like spiderwebs, decorated by sticky droplets that glow in the blue light emitted by their tails, attracting small insects. The species pictured in this series is Arachnocampa richardsae.
Micronova
MicronovaVibrant moss surrounds a seductive trap of light from a glowworm, partially hidden by a broken root, in Melba Gully, Great Otway National Park, Australia. This series was taken at Melba Gully (a rainforest walk in the Great Otway National Park) and at the Glowworm Tunnel (an abandoned train tunnel in the Wollemi National Park, near the Blue Mountains). The glowworms are fly larvae from a fungus gnat from the Keroplatidae family. This species is tiny, the worm about 1 cm, the gooey web cave they build around 3 cm wide or so. The larvae build a structure composed of a horizontal mucous tube suspended by a network of threads attached to rocks, bark or soil. They can turn around in the tube and move back and forth. They build snares, much like spiderwebs, decorated by sticky droplets that glow in the blue light emitted by their tails, attracting small insects. The species pictured in this series is Arachnocampa richardsae.
Galactic Burrow
Galactic BurrowGlowworms extend like the arm of a galaxy, inside the moist and dark stretches of the Glowworm Cave, Wollemi National Park, Australia. This series was taken at Melba Gully (a rainforest walk in the Great Otway National Park) and at the Glowworm Tunnel (an abandoned train tunnel in the Wollemi National Park, near the Blue Mountains). The glowworms are fly larvae from a fungus gnat from the Keroplatidae family. This species is tiny, the worm about 1 cm, the gooey web cave they build around 3 cm wide or so. The larvae build a structure composed of a horizontal mucous tube suspended by a network of threads attached to rocks, bark or soil. They can turn around in the tube and move back and forth. They build snares, much like spiderwebs, decorated by sticky droplets that glow in the blue light emitted by their tails, attracting small insects. The species pictured in this series is Arachnocampa richardsae.
Biopleiades
BiopleiadesDead ferns open a portal towards a constellation of shimmering glowworms, in Melba Gully, Great Otway National Park, Australia. This series was taken at Melba Gully (a rainforest walk in the Great Otway National Park) and at the Glowworm Tunnel (an abandoned train tunnel in the Wollemi National Park, near the Blue Mountains). The glowworms are fly larvae from a fungus gnat from the Keroplatidae family. This species is tiny, the worm about 1 cm, the gooey web cave they build around 3 cm wide or so. The larvae build a structure composed of a horizontal mucous tube suspended by a network of threads attached to rocks, bark or soil. They can turn around in the tube and move back and forth. They build snares, much like spiderwebs, decorated by sticky droplets that glow in the blue light emitted by their tails, attracting small insects. The species pictured in this series is Arachnocampa richardsae.
Cosmonaut 1
Cosmonaut 1Photographer Timothy Dahlum gazes upon a constellation of glowworms near the moonlit entrance of the Glowworm Cave, Wollemi National Park, Australia. This series was taken at Melba Gully (a rainforest walk in the Great Otway National Park) and at the Glowworm Tunnel (an abandoned train tunnel in the Wollemi National Park, near the Blue Mountains). The glowworms are fly larvae from a fungus gnat from the Keroplatidae family. This species is tiny, the worm about 1 cm, the gooey web cave they build around 3 cm wide or so. The larvae build a structure composed of a horizontal mucous tube suspended by a network of threads attached to rocks, bark or soil. They can turn around in the tube and move back and forth. They build snares, much like spiderwebs, decorated by sticky droplets that glow in the blue light emitted by their tails, attracting small insects. The species pictured in this series is Arachnocampa richardsae.
Ophiuchus Minor
Ophiuchus MinorGlowworms light up the darker crevices of a moist rock wall divided by an exposed root, in Melba Gully, Great Otway National Park, Australia. This series was taken at Melba Gully (a rainforest walk in the Great Otway National Park) and at the Glowworm Tunnel (an abandoned train tunnel in the Wollemi National Park, near the Blue Mountains). The glowworms are fly larvae from a fungus gnat from the Keroplatidae family. This species is tiny, the worm about 1 cm, the gooey web cave they build around 3 cm wide or so. The larvae build a structure composed of a horizontal mucous tube suspended by a network of threads attached to rocks, bark or soil. They can turn around in the tube and move back and forth. They build snares, much like spiderwebs, decorated by sticky droplets that glow in the blue light emitted by their tails, attracting small insects. The species pictured in this series is Arachnocampa richardsae.
Nebulous Arch
Nebulous ArchA brittle bridge of sticky mucous dangles precariously, lit by the starry blue light of a glowworm, at Melba Gully, Great Otway National Park, Australia. This series was taken at Melba Gully (a rainforest walk in the Great Otway National Park) and at the Glowworm Tunnel (an abandoned train tunnel in the Wollemi National Park, near the Blue Mountains). The glowworms are fly larvae from a fungus gnat from the Keroplatidae family. This species is tiny, the worm about 1 cm, the gooey web cave they build around 3 cm wide or so. The larvae build a structure composed of a horizontal mucous tube suspended by a network of threads attached to rocks, bark or soil. They can turn around in the tube and move back and forth. They build snares, much like spiderwebs, decorated by sticky droplets that glow in the blue light emitted by their tails, attracting small insects. The species pictured in this series is Arachnocampa richardsae.
Globular Cluster
Globular ClusterGlowworms gather like a constellation inside a concave nook of the Glowworm Cave, Wollemi National Park, Australia. This series was taken at Melba Gully (a rainforest walk in the Great Otway National Park) and at the Glowworm Tunnel (an abandoned train tunnel in the Wollemi National Park, near the Blue Mountains). The glowworms are fly larvae from a fungus gnat from the Keroplatidae family. This species is tiny, the worm about 1 cm, the gooey web cave they build around 3 cm wide or so. The larvae build a structure composed of a horizontal mucous tube suspended by a network of threads attached to rocks, bark or soil. They can turn around in the tube and move back and forth. They build snares, much like spiderwebs, decorated by sticky droplets that glow in the blue light emitted by their tails, attracting small insects. The species pictured in this series is Arachnocampa richardsae.
Meteor Grotto
Meteor GrottoLike a meteoric rain, stocky droplets of mucous from a glowworm sparkle suspended in a miniature cavern, in Melba Gully, Great Otway National Park, Australia. This series was taken at Melba Gully (a rainforest walk in the Great Otway National Park) and at the Glowworm Tunnel (an abandoned train tunnel in the Wollemi National Park, near the Blue Mountains). The glowworms are fly larvae from a fungus gnat from the Keroplatidae family. This species is tiny, the worm about 1 cm, the gooey web cave they build around 3 cm wide or so. The larvae build a structure composed of a horizontal mucous tube suspended by a network of threads attached to rocks, bark or soil. They can turn around in the tube and move back and forth. They build snares, much like spiderwebs, decorated by sticky droplets that glow in the blue light emitted by their tails, attracting small insects. The species pictured in this series is Arachnocampa richardsae.
Pupa Australis
Pupa AustralisA network of lichen-covered tendrils paints a Gigeresque landscape that houses a single glowworm, in Melba Gully, Great Otway National Park, Australia. This series was taken at Melba Gully (a rainforest walk in the Great Otway National Park) and at the Glowworm Tunnel (an abandoned train tunnel in the Wollemi National Park, near the Blue Mountains). The glowworms are fly larvae from a fungus gnat from the Keroplatidae family. This species is tiny, the worm about 1 cm, the gooey web cave they build around 3 cm wide or so. The larvae build a structure composed of a horizontal mucous tube suspended by a network of threads attached to rocks, bark or soil. They can turn around in the tube and move back and forth. They build snares, much like spiderwebs, decorated by sticky droplets that glow in the blue light emitted by their tails, attracting small insects. The species pictured in this series is Arachnocampa richardsae.
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